Dead Air and Double Dares

Today I welcome Janis Thornton to my pages to talk about her new release, Dead Air and Double Dares. Welcome, Janis.

Why do you write cozy mysteries?
I have always loved mysteries, and was reading such authors as Mary Higgins Clark, Sue Grafton, and Lawrence Block long before it occurred to me to try to write a mystery of my own. When I finally did start writing, I was surprised by how much of my slightly offbeat sense of humor kept seeping in. That’s when I began to deliberately inject comedy into my stories. Humor was useful in defining my characters’ personalities, perspectives and demeanor, making dialogue sparkle, and softening the edge on life-and-death situations. It wasn’t until PageSpring Publishing accepted my first mystery novel —Elmwood Confidential and later retitled Dust Bunnies and Dead Bodies — did I know I’d been writing cozies all along. Duh.

Please tell us about your book. What ideas or images inspired this novel?
The starting point in plotting Book 2 in the Elmwood Confidential series was my protagonist — Crystal Cropper, the Boomer-aged, Los Angeles-trained, crime-beat reporter who came home to her small, Indiana town and became editor for her local paper, the Elmwood Gazette.
During my own years as editor of a small-town newspaper, I enjoyed a great relationship with the owner of the local radio station, even though he was my paper’s number one competition for local stories. So, as I pondered storylines for the second book in the series, I got to thinking: What if the owner of the Elmwood radio station wasn’t such a charitable guy? What if he used his airwaves to ruin the reputation of townspeople he perceived as adversaries, threats, or competitors? And what if he had ruined so many lives that, when he turns up murdered, almost anyone in Elmwood could be the suspect — including my protagonist, Crystal Cropper?

Do you have an ideal reader in mind when you write? If so, please describe that reader.
Although my mom was in her late sixties when she passed away, her outlook was youthful and unbound by age. She loved solving mysteries almost as much as she loved endings that surprised her. She also loved to laugh. That’s why she’s the ideal reader I’m writing for.

Please describe your writing routine.
If, by “routine,” you mean a ritual adhered to day in and day out, then I must confess — I don’t have one. What I do have are a day job and an inordinate number of commitments spawned from my inability to “just say no.” Fortunately, I’m at my creative peak late in the evening, typically after 9 o’clock, so I generally get in two or three uninterrupted hours of writing before bedtime.

What advice do you give new writers just starting out?
I tell them to stop talking about it and write … and to write daily. I tell them to make writing a priority, to stop waiting for inspiration, and to just write. To write even when they think they have nothing to say. I also urge them to take classes, attend writers’ conferences, join a writers’ group, and never ever underestimate how hard it is to commit to doing these things. I also tell them if they listen to me and take my advice, they will be on their way.

More about Dead Air and Double Dares:
Crystal Cropper, editor of the Elmwood Gazette, has added incentive in finding out who killed Horace Q. Ogilvie, owner of the local radio station and the most reviled man in town. Horace turns up dead minutes before he is supposed to broadcast his next malicious editorial, designed to destroy yet another Elmwood luminary. Fortunately for the police department, Horace’s list of future targets provides an abundant pool of suspects. Unfortunately for Crystal, her name is at the top!

Grab your copy here:

a Rafflecopter giveaway

How to connect with Janis:

Website: www.janis-thornton.com
Public email address: janisthor@aol.com
Facebook: www.facebook.com/janisthorntonauthor/
Twitter: twitter.com/JanisThornton

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The Devil’s Cold Dish

Author Eleanor Kuhns stops by my pages to talk about the inspiration behind her book, The Devil’s Cold Dish. Eleanor is the 2011 winner of the Minotaur Books/Mystery Writers of America First Crime Novel. A lifelong librarian, she received her Masters from Columbia University and is currently the Assistant Director of the Goshen Public Library in Orange County, New York.

More about The Devil’s Cold Dish:
Will Rees is back home on his farm in 1796 Maine with his teenage son, his pregnant wife, their five adopted children, and endless farm work under the blistering summer sun. But for all that, Rees is happy to have returned to Dugard, Maine, the town where he was born and raised, and where he’s always felt at home. Until now. When a man is found dead – murdered – after getting into a public dispute with Rees, Rees starts to realize someone is intentionally trying to pin the murder on him. Then, his farm is attacked, his wife is accused of witchcraft, and a second body is found that points to the Rees family. Rees can feel the town of Dugard turning against him, and he knows that he and his family won’t be safe there unless he can find the murderer and reveal the truth…before the murderer gets to him first.

Grab your copy here:

How to connect with Eleanor:
Website URL: www.eleanor-kuhns.com
Blog URL: www.eleanor-kuhns.com/blog
Facebook URL: www.facebook.com/Eleanor-Kuhns
Twitter: #EleanorKuhns
LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/eleanor-kuhns-36759623

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Killer Music

Tammy L. Grace visits my pages today to talk about the inspiration behind her book, Killer Music. Welcome, Tammy.

Why do you write cozy mysteries?
I’ve always loved puzzles and the fun of solving mysteries. I love whodunits and find I tend to write in the genres I enjoy reading. I wanted to craft a mystery, but not a gory and violent story. The unraveling of clues, creating red herrings with many suspects, and tagging along with a lovable main character are fun and appeal to me as a writer.

Please tell us about your book. What ideas or images inspired this novel?
This book is the first mystery in my Cooper Harrington Detective Series. It is set in Nashville and I was inspired to create it when I took a trip to Nashville a few years ago. I visited several historic sites and while on a tour I spotted the perfect location for a murder. I drove through the wealthy Belle Meade neighborhood and the idea for a private detective who lived with his affluent aunt began to blossom.
In this first book, Coop is hired to solve the murder of a record label mogul. Coop has a sidekick in the form of his college friend, Annabelle. She works with him and runs his office. Coop also has a loyal golden retriever, Gus, who accompanies him on his cases. Along with his office staff, Coop is supported by Aunt Camille, who is a bit nosy, but well-meaning.
As Coop delves into the case he discovers several suspects and reasons the victim could have been murdered. With the help of his best friend and Chief of Detectives, he unravels the clues and solves the case. There are plenty of twists and turns to keep readers turning the pages.

Do you have an ideal reader in mind when you write? If so, please describe that reader.
My ideal reader is someone who likes plot twists without gore, violence, and sex. My reader also appreciates a skilled main character, as opposed to an amateur who happens upon crimes. Most of my readers tell me they didn’t have the mystery solved until the end, which means my ideal reader enjoys a bit of suspense and a difficult case.

Please describe your writing routine.
I tend to be an early riser and get most of my writing done in the early morning. I try to write each day for at least a few hours. For my mystery series I have a very detailed outline with clues and various plot points defined before I start writing the book. That is the hardest part for me. Once I have a solid outline, the actual writing of the story is relatively quick. The draft then goes through an editing process, including beta readers before the final proofreading.

What advice do you give new writers just starting out?
When I first started writing, I attended a conference and found it to be very worthwhile. I still attend writing workshops and conferences and highly recommend doing so before choosing a publishing path. I learned so much information and connected with other authors. I also encourage writers to choose a conference that is not too large, so they are not overwhelmed or lost in the crowd.

More about Killer Music:
When private detective Cooper “Coop” Harrington meets record label mogul Grayson Taylor at a swank gathering of country music artists and politicians, he never imagines he’ll be investigating his brutal murder less than twenty-four hours later.
The suspects are plentiful. More than a handful of people could have wanted him dead. Retained by Taylor’s widow, Coop works alongside his best friend and Chief of Detectives, Ben Mason. The investigation leads Coop and Ben to visit the luxurious mansions of recording industry magnates, navigate the murky undercurrents of the political world, and probe complicated family matters. Scandalous indiscretions, secrets, and hints of corruption swirl in the midst of their pursuit of the killer.
Coop’s faithful friend and assistant, Annabelle and his loyal golden retriever, Gus, both lend a hand during the investigation. Even his Aunt Camille mines the local gossip mill to unearth potential killers with motive. Yet the case seems hopeless until a crucial piece of evidence emerges that sends Coop and Ben on a race to catch the killer before someone else dies.

How to connect with Tammy:

Website: http://www.tammylgrace.com/

Blog: http://www.tammylgrace.com/blog.html

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tammylgrace.books

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/7799289.Tammy_L_Grace

Twitter: https://twitter.com/TammyLGrace

Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/author/tammylgrace

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Treble at the Jam Fest

Today I welcome author Leslie Budewitz to talk about her latest release, Treble at the Jam Fest. This is the fourth book in the Food Lovers’ Village mystery series. Welcome, Leslie!

Why do you write cozy mysteries?
Whether it’s set in a small town or a community within a larger city, in the past or the present, whether the amateur sleuth is single or widowed, young or old, whether we like the victim or think she needed killing, the murder in a mystery is a shock that disrupts the norm. It must be solved—and this is key — to restore a sense of order. Of course, there’s one in every book, so the reader isn’t shocked, but the residents are. They share an underlying belief that people are basically good, and natural order can be restored.
Some writers don’t like the term cozy. The great Carolyn Hart, whom I adore, says what’s more uncomfortable than murder in a small town where everyone is affected? I live in a small town, and she’s right. I never want to forget that murder is not just a means to tell a story — it’s real, and it hurts everyone.
But I like the term, because ultimately any book with an amateur sleuth is about community. Our intrepid sleuth steps away from her busy life to investigate because it’s necessary. The job of the professional investigators is to restore external order by making an arrest and bringing the killer into the justice system. But the job of the amateur sleuth is to restore internal order within the community. To restore the social order.
She does that by being part of the community, whether she’s new to it, a long-timer, or a woman returning home. Her occupation — running a coffeehouse or a pet-friendly hotel, catering, or midwifery — puts her at the heart of the community. She knows everyone. She understands the dynamics. She can see things the professionals can’t see and ask questions they can’t ask, because she knows what goes on. Often, her expertise gives her an advantage — because she knows the true value of the stolen rare book, beyond its price, she can understand the motivation to take it and identify the killer the police never suspected.
The characters and their relationships drive the plot, and the entire novel. And so I find the label “cozy” a positive choice. A hopeful choice.
As I often tell readers, cozies are the comfort food of the mystery world. And don’t we all crave a little mac and cheese now and then?

Please tell us about your book. What ideas or images inspired this novel?
Treble at the Jam Fest is the 4th Food Lovers’ Village mystery, and it’s a delight to return to the village of Jewel Bay – all resemblance to the town where I live fully intended! It’s late May, and Erin has her hands full getting the Merc ready for summer, hiring a new sales clerk, and meeting her boyfriend Adam’s visiting BFF. It’s also time for the annual Jewel Bay Jazz Festival. When Adam and his buddy find the body of an internationally-renowned guitarist on the river bank near town, Erin investigates to protect the community and keep the music playing.
In real life, my town hosts an annual guitar workshop and festival in late August. My husband often attends as a student, and we go to every concert. I wanted to take a bit of that energy, and the occasional conflict, and expand and explore it on the page. My books always include a lot of food and the recipes to recreate the food from the festival at home, so creating and testing the recipes is always a lot of fun.

Do you have an ideal reader in mind when you write? If so, please describe that reader.
I was a reader before I became a writer, so I rely heavily on my instincts. I write what I want to read. I understand that my readers have certain expectations – the main character must drive the story, be smart and independent and able to get herself out of trouble, and be someone the readers want to spend several hours with. My readers enjoy learning things about the businesses Erin, and Pepper in the Spice Shop Mysteries, run, and the specific problems that lead to the mystery. They like the food and festivals, visiting Montana and the Pacific Northwest, and they like a story that’s about something. So do I, so it’s a perfect match!

Please describe your writing routine.
I write every day, primarily in the morning, leaving afternoons for promotion and some legal work. (I’m still part of a small civil litigation firm, primarily doing research and writing.) Some writers call themselves outliners; others see themselves as “pantsers,” writing by the seat of their pants! (Others call that organic writing, or as my friend Elizabeth Zelvin says, “writing into the mist.” I consider myself a planner. Plot grows out of the characters – what they want in this particular scenario, and what they’ll do to get it. Once I understand the central emotional conflict, I can begin to see what the characters will do. It’s definitely a process of discovery. I outline as far as I can – a few sentences for each chapter – and I nearly always know the ending, or at least I think I do! For each series, and the stand-alone I’m working on now, I’ve developed a 3-ring binder with character write-ups, notes, calendars, clippings, pictures of outfits torn from magazines, even sketches of buildings or details that catch my eye. I draw maps of the invented communities, and tack others to the door of my office. And for Treble at the Jam Fest, I listened to a lot of jazz, and ate a lot of huckleberry jam!

What advice do you give new writers just starting out?
Teach yourself to read like a writer. Find the joy in a regular writing practice. Keep learning, keep working. Build a community. Writers spend a lot of time alone with people who only exist because we make them up, but every opportunity I’ve had as a writer has come because of a group.
It is such a gift to be trusted with someone’s most valuable assets – their time and attention. I am so grateful for this opportunity, to pursue my love of exploring the world through storytelling and sharing it with readers.

More about Treble at the Jam Fest:
Erin Murphy, manager of Murphy’s Mercantile (aka the Merc), is tuning up for Jewel Bay’s annual Jazz Festival. Between keeping the Merc’s shelves stocked with Montana’s tastiest local fare and hosting the festival’s kick-off concert, Erin has her hands full.
Discord erupts when jazz guitarist Gerry Martin is found dead on the rocks above the Jewel River. The one-time international sensation had fallen out of sync with festival organizers, students, and performers. Was his death an accident — or did someone even the score?
Despite the warning signs to not get involved, Erin investigates. And when the killer attacks, she orchestrates her efforts into one last crescendo, hoping to avoid a deadly finale.

Grab your copy here:

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How to connect with Leslie:
Website: www.LeslieBudewitz.com
Email address: Leslie@LeslieBudewitz.com
Facebook: www.Facebook.com/LeslieBudewitzAuthor
Twitter: www.Twitter.com/LeslieBudewitz or @LeslieBudewitz
Buy Link: Midnight Ink: http://www.midnightinkbooks.com/product.php?ean=9780738752402

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The Clock Strikes Nun

Today I welcome Alice Loweecey to talk about the inspiration behind her newest book, The Clock Strikes Nun. Welcome, Alice.

Why do you write cozy mysteries?
Actually, I didn’t plan to write cozies. I like humor and discovered I could write humorous mysteries. Because of my main character’s personality, the books turned out to be mostly cozy. I do have some on-screen violence and my villains don’t always keep their dialogue to a PG rating.

Please tell us about your book. What ideas or images inspired this novel?
So many things! I’ve always been interested in post-apocalyptic survival. (I have a post-apoc novel with Dark Recesses Press under my pen name of Kate Morgan). Then I came across “Tactical Bacon” on Amazon. That led me down a delightful Prepper rabbit hole. I have first-hand experience with cults. A friend’s Hallowe’en costume put the icing on the cake: She dressed as the Horned God and my Prepper cult was born.

Do you have an ideal reader in mind when you write? If so, please describe that reader.
I don’t, really, even though I think I write for women. Some of my biggest fans are men and I’ve received fan mail from readers of all ages. I write to make people laugh and forget about the daily grind for awhile.

Please describe your writing routine.
Get home from the Day Job, make dinner, eat dinner, clean up dinner, deal with email, and write, write, write. Deadlines loom regardless of the vacuuming and how tired I might be. The only way I can meet them is to get my Butt In Chair. The cats like this, too.

What advice do you give new writers just starting out?
Don’t wait for the muse to tap you with her sparkly wand. The craft is work. Work at it every day (with the occasional day off because everyone needs a day off). Pound at that keyboard because the only way you get to be a better writer is to hone your craft.

More about The Clock Strikes Nun:
When terrified Elaine Patrick knocks on Driscoll Investigations’ door and insists her house is haunted, Giulia Driscoll’s first response is “we don’t handle ghosts.” When Elaine’s housekeeper and crackpot filthy rich cousin descend on Giulia and demand she find out who’s trying to steal sweet, fragile Elaine’s family business out from under her, that’s a different story. They want DI to provide Tarot readings, ghost hunting sessions, and even an exorcism.
Ghost hunting? There are apps for that. Tarot readings? Experts in the skill are right across the street. Exorcisms? Having a priest for a brother-in-law comes in handy. Giulia plunges into a crash course in all things supernatural, convinced everything happening to Elaine is stagecraft.
Except when it isn’t. Giulia’s about to discover a new dimension to sleuthing, if she can survive attempted murder long enough to see through the web of lies around her client.

Grab your copy here!

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How to connect with Alice:
Website: aliceloweecey.net
Facebook: facebook.com/GiuliaDriscoll
Twitter: @AliceLoweecey
Goodreads: Alice Loweecey

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Watching the Detectives

Julie Mulhern stops by my page today to talk about her cozy mystery, Watching the Detectives. Welcome, Julie.

Why do you write cozy mysteries?
As a reader, I am enamored with a story’s promise. The story promise in a cozy mystery is that the villain will be caught and order restored. I need order right now — even if it’s just in books.

Please tell us about your book. What ideas or images inspired this novel?
Watching the Detectives is the fifth book in the Country Club Murders series. Like my other books, it mixes murder, humor, women’s issues, and the 1970s. As I’m writing I don’t know if all that mixing will create something light and fluffy or something dark and savory. Let’s just say Ellison finds more bodies, more trouble, and (hopefully) more hilarity on her way to catching a killer. The book was inspired by an article I read about dishonest decorators.

Do you have an ideal reader in mind when you write? If so, please describe that reader.
I don’t have an ideal reader in mind. Conventional wisdom says that the audience for my books consists of women older than forty-five. Truth is I hear from a variety of readers (both men and women) who love Ellison and the gang.

Please describe your writing routine.
I have a full-time job so I get up early in the morning and write for a few hours before I start my day.

What advice do you give new writers just starting out?
Advice? Me? I guess my number one piece of advice is to enjoy the journey and celebrate every accomplishment along the way.

More about Watching the Detectives:
Ellison Russell wanted a decorator, not a corpse. Too bad she finds Mrs. White in the study killed with a revolver. Things go from bad to worse when she finds Mr. White in the dining room killed with a candlestick. With so many bodies, is it any wonder Detective Anarchy Jones’ new partner considers Ellison a suspect?
With the country club gossips talking a mile a minute, an unexpected cocktail party, a visit from Aunt Sis, and a romantic decision, Ellison hardly has time to think about murder. Unfortunately, the killer has plenty of time to think about her.

Grab your copy here:

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Webpage – www.juliemulhernauthor.com
FB – https://www.facebook.com/juliekmulhern/?ref=hl
Twitter – https://twitter.com/JulieKMulhern
Goodreads – https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/8573907.Julie_Mulhern

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Mrs. Odboddy: Undercover Courier

Elaine Faber visits my website today to talk about her newest release, Mrs. Odboddy: Undercover Courier. Welcome, Elaine!

Why do you write cozy mysteries?
None of us can honestly say we do not have issues in our lives that cause us worry and stress, whether it is personal, financial or involves someone we love. When a reader picks up my books, I want to transport them to a place where they can laugh, experience a completely different life than their own, and accompany my protagonist on a journey. Perhaps they will forget their troubles, if only for a little while. Though reading any genre of book can help distract readers from their worries, I feel that cozy mysteries, without extreme violence, explicit sex or profanity are best suited to this goal. Traveling with Mrs. Odboddy on her cross-country train journey will certainly do the trick.

Please tell us about your book. What ideas or images inspired this novel?
I started by writing a short story about an elderly, eccentric, outspoken woman fighting the war from the home front during WWII. As the story begins, funny Mrs. Odboddy is determined to bring Nazi spies and miscreants to justice. While researching WWII incidents, I discovered several little known events that were generally kept top secret from the public. It became imperative that Mrs. Odboddy should disclose and become involved in these wartime events.
In the second Mrs. O novel, Agnes carries a package to President Roosevelt. She is sure it contains secret war documents and equally sure that Nazi agents will attempt to steal her package while traveling from California to Washington by train. Whenever Mrs. Odboddy is concerned, miscalculations and hysteria will follow as she witnesses the suspected spy ‘commit murder’ and is just as sure that her own life is now in danger. Add a couple of Tuskegee airmen, an inadequate caregiver to a precious child, and a shell-shocked veteran who renders unexpected assistance and you have the framework of Mrs. Odboddy’s cross country journey by train.

Do you have an ideal reader in mind when you write? If so, please describe that reader.
I believe that everyone from teens to the elderly would enjoy this book. Teens because they will learn how folks lived during WWII and understand some of the deprivations they endured, some of the outdated social injustice and disturbing political issues, e.g. Jim Crow laws, or how FBI leader, J. Edgar Hoover, suspected and harassed Mrs. Roosevelt. Elderly folks will enjoy reading and remembering experiencing these events in their younger years. In the first Mrs. Odboddy Hometown Patriot, much of the home life during WWII is described as experienced by Agnes.

Please describe your writing routine.
I’m at my computer every day, whether answering emails, arranging for blog interviews or book reviews, writing guest posts or copy for my own blog, editing or writing WIP. I’m currently working on another cozy cat mystery. I often contribute short stories to anthologies. As an editor on an annual anthology for Inspire Christian Writers, some days I’m editing other writer’s manuscripts. It’s all part of growing, helping others and promoting my own books.

What advice do you give new writers just starting out?
Take time to learn. Attend critique groups, share your work with others, and seek advice from more experienced writers. Enter contests, submit to anthologies. Don’t be in a hurry to publish your first book. It hurts your chance of eventual success if you put out work before you’ve honed your craft to the best it can be. This comes with practice.

More about Mrs. Odboddy: Undercover Courier:
Asked to accompany Mrs. Roosevelt on her Pacific Island tour, Agnes and Katherine travel by train to Washington, D.C. Agnes carries a package for Colonel Farthingworth to President Roosevelt.
Convinced the package contains secret war documents, Agnes expects Nazi spies to try and derail her mission.
She meets Irving, whose wife mysteriously disappears from the train; Nanny, the unfeeling caregiver to little Madeline; two soldiers bound for training as Tuskegee airmen; and Charles, the shell-shocked veteran, who lends an unexpected helping hand. Who will Agnes trust? Who is the Nazi spy?
When enemy forces make a final attempt to steal the package in Washington, D.C., Agnes must accept her own vulnerability as a warrior on the home front.
Can Agnes overcome multiple obstacles, deliver the package to the President, and still meet Mrs. Roosevelt’s plane before she leaves for the Pacific Islands?

Grab your copy here!

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How to connect with Elaine:
Website: www.mindcandymysteries.com
Email address: Elaine.Faber@mindcandymysteries.com
Facebook: http://tinyurl.com/zm2j4n5

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Bloodline: A Witch Cat Mystery

Today I welcome author Vicki Vass to talk about the inspiration behind her new cozy mystery, Bloodline: A Witch Cat Mystery. Welcome, Vicki!

Why do you write cozy mysteries?
I’ve enjoyed the genre since I started reading Nancy Drew back in first grade. I wrote my first short cozy in second grade called the The Secret of the Topaz only to be disappointed to learn that topazes are actually yellow. It took me almost thirty years to write another cozy mystery. That one became the antique hunters, chronicling the adventures of my two best friends, Anne and CC.

Please tell us about your book. What ideas or images inspired this novel?
I have been fascinated by witches since I watched Bewitched growing up. I find the Salem Witch Trials fascinating and have always wanted to include them in the story. However, I did not want to set my story in Salem. My husband and I traveled to Asheville, North Carolina, last summer. The atmosphere of the location stayed with me, and I wanted to share that in this story.

Do you have an ideal reader in mind when you write? If so, please describe that reader.
I don’t have an ideal reader. I write what I like to read; my stories tend to be fast-paced and dialogue heavy.

Please describe your writing routine.
I don’t write outlines for my stories. I start with an idea and then develop it as I go along, often changing scenes or moving plot points around until I get to a good first draft. Then the real work begins. I spend time adding details, then editing, then reading and rereading to make sure it all works.

What advice do you give new writers just starting out?
The best advice I would say is just write. Put the pen to paper and write your story. Finish the first draft and then go back and fix it. The best advice I received as a journalist was to dump everything into the first draft and than go back and cut it in half.

More about Bloodline:
Fleeing the witch trials in Salem, Terra Rowan finds herself in modern day Asheville, North Carolina. A dark spirit from the past hunts this last witch of Salem. With the help of the ladies of the Biltmore Society, Terra must discover the secret within the forest to preserve the bloodline.

Grab your copy here!

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How to connect with Vicki:
Website: http://www.vickivass.com/
Blog: https://vickivass.wordpress.com/2015/07/04/heading-home/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vickivassauthor

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Bad to the Bone

Linda Johnston visits my website today to share news of her recent release, Bad to the Bone. Welcome, Linda.

Here’s more about Bad to the Bone:
Veterinary technician Carrie Kennersly, owner of the Barkery & Biscuits bakery for dogs, is reluctant to sell her recipes to pet food manufacturer VimPets. Jack Loroco, a VimPets representative, assures Carrie that it would be a great opportunity to grow her business. His promising new relationship with Carrie’s friend, Billi Matlock, doesn’t hurt his cause. But the budding romance takes a bad turn when Wanda Addler, another VimPets employee, sets her sights on Jack.
After threatening to ruin Jack’s career if he doesn’t give her what she wants, Wanda is found dead. Jack and Billi are put at the top of the suspect list, and Carrie is doggone determined to rescue them from a life behind bars.

Grab your copy here:

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About the Author:
Linda O. Johnston’s first published fiction appeared in Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine and won the Robert L. Fish Memorial Award for Best First Mystery Short Story of the year. Since then, Linda, a former lawyer who is now a full-time writer, has published more short stories, novellas, and 38 romance and mystery novels, including the Pet Rescue Mystery Series, a spinoff from her Kendra Ballantyne, Pet-Sitter mysteries for Berkley Prime Crime, and Harlequin Romantic Suspense as well as the Alpha Force paranormal romance miniseries for Harlequin Nocturne. She additionally writes the Superstition Mysteries for Midnight Ink. Her latest cozy mystery series, the Barkery and Biscuits Mysteries are also from Midnight Ink.

How to connect with Linda:
Webpage: www.LindaOJohnston.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LindaOJohnston

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Thank you!

Hey, guys.
I just wanted to say a sincere thank you to the many readers who have emailed me or posted a comment on my blog. I so appreciate your passion for the characters of Celebration House! I’m glad you enjoy the books and amazed at how fast you read them. Seriously. You all read fast!
Return to Celebration House was originally scheduled to publish on May 1st. But Melanie and I had some challenges. Let’s be honest: she’s not the easiest person to get along with. (I’m just kidding).
We’re making great progress now, and my plan is to publish the book at the end of May. And yes, Nook and iBook readers, it will be available on your devices. (I learned that the hard way!)
Happy Mother’s Day to all of you, and again, thank you so much for your praise and enthusiasm.
Annette

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